Psoriatic Arthritis Nails

Psoriatic Arthritis Nails

People who have psoriasis, a skin ailment that results in red, scaly areas, may experience psoriatic arthritis, a particular type of arthritis. Nail alterations are one of the primary symptoms of arthritis with psoriasis and may include:

  1. Pitting: Small depressions or dents on the surface of the nail.
  2. Separation: The nail separates from the nail bed, causing a gap to form.
  3. Discoloration: The nail may turn yellow or brown, or develop white patches.
  4. Thickening: The nail may become thicker than normal.
  5. Crumbling: The nail may become brittle and crumble easily.

Psoriatic Arthritis Nails

It’s crucial to visit a physician or dermatologist for a diagnosis if you have psoriasis and experience any of these alterations in your nails. They can aid in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis and recommend the best course of action in managing your symptoms.

psoriatic arthritis symptoms nails

Psoriatic arthritis nails can cause a variety of symptoms that affect the appearance and function of the nails. Some common symptoms of psoriatic arthritis nails include:

  1. Pitting: Small, shallow depressions or pits on the surface of the nail.
  2. Onycholysis: Separation of the nail from the nail bed, causing a gap to form.
  3. Subungual hyperkeratosis: Thickening of the skin underneath the nail, which can cause the nail to lift up.
  4. Nail plate crumbling: Crumbling or flaking of the nail plate.
  5. Nail plate thickening: Thickening of the nail plate, which can cause the nail to become deformed.
  6. Oil spots: Discoloration of the nail, which can appear as yellow or brown spots.
  7. Beau’s lines: Indentations or grooves that run horizontally across the nail.

In addition to nail changes, psoriatic arthritis may also cause joint pain, stiffness, and swelling, as well as skin changes such as redness, scaling, and flaking. If you have psoriasis and notice changes in your nails, it’s important to talk to your healthcare provider or dermatologist for an evaluation and appropriate treatment. Early intervention can help manage symptoms and prevent further damage to the nails and surrounding tissues.Psoriatic Arthritis NailsPsoriatic Arthritis NailsPsoriatic Arthritis NailsPsoriatic Arthritis Nails

Causes

It remains unclear entirely what causes the specific nail abnormalities that might result from the inflammatory arthritis psoriatic arthritis. The nail matrix, which refers to the region of the nail beds where fresh tissues are formed, is the area or the nail base where inflammation appears to be connected to the development of arthritis caused by psoriasis nails.

The same inflammatory response that results in psoriasis and arthritis associated with psoriasis may additionally cause inflammation in the nail’s nail matrix. In psoriasis, healthy skin cells mistakenly get attacked by the immune system, resulting in the growth of scaly, red patches on the skin. The immune system also targets the joints along with other bodily tissues in psoriatic arthritis, causing in joint pain, edema, and stiffness.

The inflammation associated with psoriatic arthritis can also affect the nail matrix, causing it to produce abnormal nail cells. This may cause the pitting, thickness, separation, discolouration, and crumbling of nails that are typical with psoriatic arthritis. In psoriatic arthritis, genetics, environmental variables, and lifestyle factors including smoking and stress can all have a role in nail alterations.

It’s crucial to consult your dermatologist or healthcare professional if you have psoriasis and notice changes in your nails. They can assess your nails, decide whether you might have psoriatic arthritis, and suggest the best course of action.

Treatment 

The treatment of psoriatic arthritis nails depends on the severity and type of nail changes, as well as the overall management of psoriatic arthritis. In general, treatment for psoriatic arthritis nails may involve a combination of medications, lifestyle changes, and topical therapies.

Medications: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and biologic medications may be prescribed to help manage joint inflammation and reduce the likelihood of nail changes. These medications work by suppressing the immune system, reducing inflammation, and slowing the progression of the disease.

Lifestyle changes: Certain lifestyle changes may also help reduce the severity of nail changes in psoriatic arthritis. For example, quitting smoking, reducing stress, and maintaining a healthy weight can all help improve overall health and reduce inflammation in the body.

Topical therapies: Topical therapies, such as corticosteroid creams or ointments, may be used to treat nail changes directly. These treatments can help reduce inflammation and improve the appearance of the nails. Other topical treatments, such as medicated nail lacquers or phototherapy, may also be recommended depending on the severity of the nail changes.

Surgery: In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove severely damaged or deformed nails. This may be done to relieve pain or prevent further damage to surrounding tissues.

If you have psoriatic arthritis nails, it’s important to talk to your healthcare provider or dermatologist for an evaluation and appropriate treatment. With the right treatment, it may be possible to manage nail changes and prevent further damage to the nails and surrounding tissues.

Types 

There are several different types of nail changes that can occur in psoriatic arthritis, and these changes can vary in severity and appearance. Some of the most common types of nail changes seen in psoriatic arthritis include:

  1. Pitting: Small, shallow depressions or pits on the surface of the nail.
  2. Onycholysis: Separation of the nail from the nail bed, causing a gap to form.
  3. Subungual hyperkeratosis: Thickening of the skin underneath the nail, which can cause the nail to lift up.
  4. Nail plate crumbling: Crumbling or flaking of the nail plate.
  5. Nail plate thickening: Thickening of the nail plate, which can cause the nail to become deformed.
  6. Oil spots: Discoloration of the nail, which can appear as yellow or brown spots.
  7. Beau’s lines: Indentations or grooves that run horizontally across the nail.

Different people may suffer different forms of nail alterations at the same time, and the type and degree of nail changes caused by psoriatic arthritis might vary between person to person. It’s crucial to consult your dermatologist or healthcare provider if you have dermatitis and notice changes to your fingertips for an assessment and the best course of action.

Diagnosis

The diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis nails typically involves a physical exam and a review of your medical history. Your healthcare provider or dermatologist may ask you questions about your symptoms, such as when you first noticed changes in your nails, and whether you have a history of psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis in your family.

During the physical exam, your healthcare provider or dermatologist will examine your nails and look for signs of nail changes associated with psoriatic arthritis, such as pitting, thickening, separation, discoloration, or crumbling. They may also examine your joints and other areas of your skin for signs of psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis.Psoriatic Arthritis NailsPsoriatic Arthritis NailsPsoriatic Arthritis Nails

In some cases, your healthcare provider or dermatologist may order blood tests or imaging studies to help confirm a diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis or rule out other conditions. Blood tests can help identify markers of inflammation in the body, while imaging studies, such as X-rays or MRI scans, can help visualize joint damage and assess the severity of the disease.

If you are diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis nails, your healthcare provider or dermatologist can work with you to develop an appropriate treatment plan. This may involve a combination of medications, lifestyle changes, and topical therapies to manage nail changes and prevent further damage to the nails and surrounding tissues.Psoriatic Arthritis NailsPsoriatic Arthritis NailsPsoriatic Arthritis Nails

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